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Curriculum

The first and second years of the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine will be completed at Utah State University in Logan, Utah. The third and fourth years, including most clinical rotations, will be completed at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington.

First Year - Utah State University

Fall Semester Required Courses

  • VM 7500 - Animals, Society and the Veterinarian
  • VM 7510 - Veterinary Microscopic Anatonomy w/ Lab
  • VM 7511 - Veterinary Anatomy I w/ Lab
  • VM 7519 - Veterinary Physiology I w/ Lab
  • VM 7568 - Animal Handling and Ag. Animal Orientation
  • VM 7586 - Principles of Surgery
  • VM 7598 - Introduction to Clinics

Spring Semester Required Courses

  • VM 7512 - Veterinary Anotomy II w/ Lab
  • VM 7520 - Veterinary Physiology II w/ Lab
  • VM 7521 - Foundations of Veterinary Neurology w/ Lab
  • VM 7534 - Veterinary Immunology
  • VM 7545 - General Pathology w/ Lab
  • VM 7580 - Basic Nutrition

Second Year - Utah State University

Fall Semester

  • VM 7522 - Fundametnals of Pharmacology
  • VM 7535 - Veterinary Virology
  • VM 7536 - Veterinary Bacteriology w/ Lab
  • VM 7546 - Systemic Pathology w/ Lab
  • VM 7589 - Clinical Pathology w/ Lab

Spring Semester

  • VM 7502 - Clinical Communication Skills
  • VM 7523 - Veterinary Toxicology w/ Lab
  • VM 7537 - Veterinary Parasitology w/ Lab
  • VM 7543 - Veterinary Medicine and Human Health
  • VM 7567 - Applied Large Animal Theriogenology
  • VM 7571 - Large Animal Theriogenology Lab
  • VM 7576 - Emerging and Exotic Diseases of Animals
  • VM 7585 - Epidemiology
  • VM 7587 - Clinical Anesthesiology w/ Lab
  • VM 7588 - Radiology w/ Lab

Course #

Course Title

Description

Semester

Notes

VM 7350 Skeletal Prep This elective is an independent project involving preparation of a skeleton.  Fall/Spring
  • Fall is open to 2nd year students only
  • $100 Fee
VM 7501 International Veterinary Medicine To increase knowledge and understanding of international issues in veterinary medicine, foreign culture, and socioeconomic systems.  Fall
  • Course runs from week 1-7
  • Course is required for the Global Animal Health Certificate Program
VM 7508 Research Orientation An informal discussion-based course designed to expose you to the broad range of research being performed in the Veterinary Medicine programs at USU and WSU. With this information you should be equipped to make an informed decision about your level of interest in- and feasibility of- performing reserach (e.g. Research Scholars Program) as a veterinary student.  Fall  
VM 7509 Research Issues, Ethics, and Literacy Through a format of selected readings and group discussion, this course seeks to introduce students to a career in research. Topics to be covered include proper use of the scientific method, scientific misconduct, conflicts of interest, intellectual property and patents, authorship, peer review and preparation of scientific articles and grant proposals.  Spring
  • Required for the Research Scholars Program
VM 7562 Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine To increase knowledge and understanding of Complementary & Alternative Vet Medicine (CAVM) Spring
  • Course runs from week 1-7
  • May have up to two Saturday labs
VM 7581 Ag Animal Problem Seminar The couses uses a problem based learning system similar to a diagnostic challenge.  Students are given a problem or scenario the previous Thursday or Friday which serves as the “case for next week.”  The cases used are representative of current problems that are ongoing in herds/flocks that are based on conversations with owner/veterinarians or material that are presented through the diagnostic lab. During the class time thre is a very informal discussion about the case.  No lectures at all.  We usually start with an overview of the case that was presented and then we work through the case in a problem based way.  the Instructor often plays the part of the owner or the rDVM and the students ask historical questions or physical findings.  We develop a differential diagnosis and hopefully get to a final diagnosis but not always. An effort is made to cover a diversity of species – cattle – beef and dairy, sheep ,goats and even some swine. Fall/Spring  
VM 7597 Special Topics: Introduction to Global Animal Health This course will present a series of ten lectures by global health faculty and local global health professionals on core topics within the field of global health.  Each lecturer will provide a synopsis of their own experiences in the field and then provide a broad overview of the larger topic for the days's lecture.  This is not a clinical global health course but will provide a broad range of topics that are now covered in the field.  Topics include Global Mental Health; Injury and Trauma; Maternal and Child Health; Nutrition; HIV/AIDS, TB, and Malaria, etc.  Students are encouraged to engage the faculty presenter in discussion following their lecture and create a dialogue on the subject presented; especially if the student would like to offer support for the lecturers approach, share lived experiences with the topic, provide alternate opinions or express disagreement with the content.  Of course, not every topic in global health can be addressed in ten lectures so this course is meant to use to connect to further study, whether it be other courses, further reading, or research/service in the field.  The class is diverse and we see the discussion section as the time when a student may take time to dig deeper into a topic with a presenter. Fall
  • Course runs from week 5-17
  • Course is required for the Global Animal Health Certificate Program
  • Typically an evening course

Practica

During the first three years in the WIMU program, you must take one practicum. If you elect to take more than one practicum, each practicum after the first is treated as an elective.

VM 7596.1 Leadership The overall purpose of this course is to encourage you to carefully analyze your responsibilities and commitments in the context of leadership for the common good and for purposeful change. We will investigate how, through personal growth, and personal commitment, each of us has the potential to transform our world and our profession. The course is more than a study of leadership. It is designed to help you develop your own leadership potential and contribute something to our college and ultimately to your chosen professional community. Spring  
VM 7596.2 Ambassadors  Throughout the calendar year, ambassadors work independently, as well as in teams to develop leadership, professional, and communication skills, through a number of service related experiences and training seminars. Topics such as maintaining confidentiality, public relations/media interaction, professional appearance and attitude, communication styles, and the history of WSU-CVM, are discussed. The experiential lab component has a few required exercises, such as creating a video for the blog/website where you are the featured speaker, and visiting elementary and higher education classrooms to speak about your experiences as a vet student or about a topic in the veterinary profession. The remaining part of the experiential lab time is open for you to choose how and when to apply the skills you are trying to develop. Spring
  • This is a year long course.
  • Student participation in this practicum is by selection.
VM 7596.3 Pet Loss Hotline The Euthanasia and Pet Loss Bereavement Course is a discussion and experiential class in which you will not only be learning about the scientific and psychological aspects of human grief and bereavement over the loss of a pet, you will be sitting in on a Pet Loss Support Group with clients referred from local providers.  The purpose of this course is twofold.  Students will be learning of the myriad of grief responses, concerns and issues from both the didactic perspective and from interacting with clients via their time observing the Pet Loss Support Group.  Although one major purpose of the group is to help students better understand how to help, support and educate their clients, the group will also be designed to provide support for the clients who call on us.   Fall/Spring
  • First come first served sign-up.
VM 7596.4 Animals, Humans and Healing The couses uses a problem based learning system similar to a diagnostic challenge.  Students are given a problem or scenario the previous Thursday or Friday which serves as the “case for next week.”  The cases used are representative of current problems that are ongoing in herds/flocks that are based on conversations with owner/veterinarians or material that are presented through the diagnostic lab. During the class time thre is a very informal discussion about the case.  No lectures at all.  We usually start with an overview of the case that was presented and then we work through the case in a problem based way.  the Instructor often plays the part of the owner or the rDVM and the students ask historical questions or physical findings.  We develop a differential diagnosis and hopefully get to a final diagnosis but not always. An effort is made to cover a diversity of species – cattle – beef and dairy, sheep ,goats and even some swine.   Spring
  • May have one Saturday lab

VM 7596 - Veterinary Practicum

  • Pet Loss Hotline
  • Leadership
  • Ambassadors
  • Animals, Humans and Healing

During the first three years in the WIMU program, you must take one practicum. If you elect to take more than one practicum, each practicum after the first is treated as an elective.

Washington State University Third Year/Fourth Year Courses and Electives

For full course descriptions, including third and fourth year classes through WSU, please refer to the WSU Veterinary Medicine Curriculum Guide.

WSU Veterinary Medicine Curriculum